Building a low-carbon future: the politics of climate change

CC-webfinalWill the reconstruction of the global economy be positive for mitigating climate change? Is the move toward energy security at odds with a low-carbon society? Do we need the return of state planning to overcome the climate change challenge? How can the response to climate change be socially just? How can we forge an achievable but also equitable and legally secure international emissions deal at Copenhagen?

By addressing these questions, leading international thinkers and practitioners put forward a compelling new account of climate change politics and policies in this pamphlet, demonstrating how a low-carbon future can be built by a revitalised co-existence of markets and the state, as well as a strong political narrative of hope and opportunity.

Building a low-carbon transition   Download “Building a low carbon future: the politics of climate change“.

 Edited by Anthony Giddens, Simon Latham, and Roger Liddle

 Outline

1. The politics of climate change: our role in the debate (Policy Network)

Section I: the dilemmas of domestic policy in advanced economies

2. Will the reconstruction of the global economy be positive for mitigating climate change? (Terry Barker)

3. Is the move toward energy security at odds with a low-carbon society? (Jim Watson)

4. Do we need the return of state planning to overcome the climate change challenge? (Felix Christian Matthes)

5. How can we build political support for action on climate change in western democracies? (Hugh Compston and Ian Bailey)

6. How can the response to climate change be socially just? (Roger Liddle and Simon Latham)

Section II: building an international framework for action

7. How can commitments on greenhouse gas emissions reductions be entrenched in the international legal system? (Stephen Hockman QC)

8. What should an international agreement on climate change at Copenhagen look like? (Mutsuyoshi Nishimura)

Section III: the United Kingdom: the poltics of low-carbon transition

9. Climate change: the political and business challenge (Peter Mandelson)

10. The UK’s carbon targets for 2020 and the role of the Committee on Climate Change (Sam Fankhauser, David Kennedy and Jim Skea)

11. Can the UK reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050? (Neil Carter)

 

About the contributors

Ian Bailey is senior lecturer in human geography at the University of Plymouth. He is the author of Turning Down the Heat: The Politics of Climate Policy in Affluent Democracies (2008, edited with Hugh Compston).

Terry Barker is director of the Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research, University of Cambridge. He is also the leader of the research programme “Integrated Modelling” at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and chairman of Cambridge Econometrics.

Neil Carter is professor of politics and a founding member of the Centre for Ecology, Law and Policy at the University of York. He is the author of The Politics of the Environment:Ideas, Activism, Policy (2007).

Hugh Compston is a reader in politics at the University of Cardiff. His publications include Policy Networks and Policy Change (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2009) and Turning Down the Heat: The Politics of Climate Policy in Affluent Democracies (2008, edited with Ian Bailey).

Samuel Fankhauser is a principal research fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics. He is also a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change.

Anthony Giddens is a former director of the London School of Economics and Political Science and a member of the House of Lords. His most recent publication is The Politics of Climate Change (2009).

Stephen Hockman QC is a trustee of ClientEarth and an environmental law specialist. He is a former chairman of the Bar Council.

David Kennedy is the chief executive of the UK Committee on Climate Change. Previously he worked on energy strategy at the World Bank and the design of infrastructure investment projects at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Simon Latham is a policy researcher at Policy Network, where he is coordinating research programmes on “The politics of climate change” and “An EU “fit for purpose in the global age”.

Roger Liddle is vice-chair of Policy Network and a visiting fellow at the LSE’s European Institute. He is former economic adviser to the European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and former European adviser to Tony Blair. His most recent publication is Beyond New Labour (2009, with Patrick Diamond).

Peter Mandelson is the UK Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform.

Felix Christian Matthes is research coordinator of Energy and Climate policy at the Öko-Institut/Institute for Applied Ecology in Berlin.

Mutsuyoshi Nishimura is special adviser on climate change to the prime minister and cabinet of Japan, and a former Japanese ambassador for the Kyoto Protocol.

Jim Skea is research director at UK Energy Research Centre and a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change. Previously, he has been the director of the Policy Studies Institute and a director of the Economic and Social Research Council’s Global Environmental Change Programme.

Jim Watson is director of the Sussex Energy Group and deputy leader of the Tyndall Centre Climate and Energy Programme at the University of Sussex.

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One response to “Building a low-carbon future: the politics of climate change

  1. Effect on the economy and cost of everyday living? Massive.

    Effect on the careers and incomes of the people involved? Massive.

    Effect on the Climate? Zero.

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